A Guide to Tokyo Haneda International (RJTT)

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Hello and welcome to my guide to Tokyo Haneda International Airport, located in Ōta, Tokyo, Japan, I hope this guide can help you navigate in and out of RJTT

ICAO RJTT IATA HND

Runway Information

Number | Length (Feet) | True Heading


RWY 16L/34R | 11,034 | 150°/330°

RWY 16R/34L | 9,842 | 150°/330°

RWY 22/04 | 8,209 | 215°/035°

RWY 23/05 | 8,203 | 222°/042°

RJTT Operators

Airline Aircraft Additional Info
Aeroflot 777-300ER Suspended
Air Asia X A330-300 N/A
Air Canada 787-9 N/A
Air China A330-300, A321-200 A321s no longer operate to HND
Air Do 767-300ER, 737-700
Air France 777-300ER N/A
All Nippon Airways Entire Fleet Main hub at HND
American Airlines 787-9, 777-300ER N/A
Asiana Airlines A330-300 Suspended
British Airways 777-300ER, 787-9 N/A
Cathay Pacific 777-300ER Suspended
China Airlines A330-300, A321-200 N/A
China Eastern Airlines 777-300ER, A321-200, A330-300
China Southern Airlines 737-800, A330-200 N/A
Delta Air Lines 777-200ER, A350-900, 767-300ER, A330-200, A330-900neo 777-200ER and 767-300ER no longer operate to HND
Emirates 777-200LR, 777-300ER No A380 😢
Eva Air A330-300 N/A
Finnair A350-900 Suspended
Garuda Indonesia 777-300ER, A330-200, A330-900neo N/A
Hainan Airlines A330-300, 737-800 N/A
Hawaiian Airlines A330-200, 767-300 767s are no longer operated to HND
HK Express A321-200 N/A
ITA Airways A350-900, A330-900neo Has not began operations
Japan Airlines Entire Fleet Main hub at HND
Juneyao Airlines 787-9 N/A
Korean Air 747-400, 777-300ER 747-400 no longer operating to HND
Lufthansa 747-8, A350-900, A340-600, A340-300 N/A
Peach A320-200 N/A
Philippine Airlines A350-900, A330-300, A340-300, A321neo N/A
Qantas 747-400 No longer operating to HND
Qatar Airways A350-900, A350-1000, 787-8 N/A
S7 Airlines A320neo N/A
Scandanavian Airlines A350-900, A330-300 N/A
Shanghai Airlines 757-200, 787-9, A330-300, 767-300 N/A
Singapore Airlines A330-300, 777-300ER, A350-900, A380-800 N/A
Skymark Airlines 737-800, A330-200, 767-200, A330-300 N/A
Solaseed Air 737-800 Plans to merge with Air Do
Spring Airlines A320-200 N/A
StarFlyer A320-200 N/A
Thai Airways International A350-900, 747-400, 777-300ER, A340-500, A380-800, 747-400, A380-800, A340-500 No longer operate
Tianjin Airlines A330-300, A320-200 N/A
Tigerair Taiwan A320-200 N/A
Turkish Airlines 787-9 N/A
United Airlines 747-400, 777-200ER, 787-10, 787-9 747-400 No longer operates
VietJet Air A321-200 N/A
Vietnam Airlines A321-200, A350-900, A330-200 N/A

Departure/Arrival Procedures

SIDs


North

ROVE2A - RWYs 04, 05, 16B, 34B
ROVE2B - RWYs 05, 16B, 34R
ROVE2C - RWYs 05, 16B, 34R
SYE3 - RWYs 04, 05, 16B, 34B

South East

RUTAS2 - RWYs 04, 05, 16B, 34B

South

ISOGO2 - RWYs 04, 05, 16B, 34B
OPPAR3 - RWYs 04, 05, 16B, 34B
VADAR1 - RWYs 04, 05, 16B, 34B
VAMOS3 - RWYs 04, 05, 16B, 22, 34B

South West

LAXAS3 - RWYs 04, 05, 16B, 22, 34B

West

NINOX3 - RWYs 04, 05, 16B, 22, 34B
RITL2A - RWYs 04, 05, 16B, 34B
RITL2B - RWYs 05, 16B, 34B
RITL2C - RWYs 05, 16B, 22, 34B

North West

BEKL2A - RWYs 04, 05, 16B, 34B
BEKL2B - RWYs 05, 16B, 34R
BEKL2C - RWYs 05, 16B, 34R

STARs


North East

DOYLE - All RWYs
GODI1C - RWYs 34B
GODI1D - RWYs 22, 23
GODI1H - RWYs 34B
GODI1S - RWYs 22, 23
GODI2A - RWYs 34B
GODI2K - RWYs 34B
GODINL - RWYs16B
GODINR - RWYs 16B
POLI1C - RWYs 34B
POLI1D - RWYs 22, 23
POLI1H - RWYs 34B
POLI1S - RWYs 22, 23
POLI2A - RWYs 34B
POLI2K - RWYs 34B
POLIXL - RWYs 16B
POLIXR - RWYs 16B
SINGO - All RWYs

South East

ADDUM - All RWYs
AROS1A - RWYs 34B
AROS1B - RWYs 22, 23
AROS1K - RWYs 34B
AROS1N - RWYs 22, 23
AROS2B - RWYs 22, 23
AROS2C - RWYs 34B
AROS2H - RWYs 34B
AROS2N - RWYs 22, 23
AROSAL - RWYs 16B
AROSAN - All RWYs
AROSAR - RWYs 16B
AROSAV - All RWYs
BONUS - All RWYs
MESSEN - All RWYs
MESSEV - All RWYs

South

AKSE1A - RWYs 34B
AKSE1B - RWYs 22, 23
AKSE1K - RWYs 34B
AKSE1N - RWYs 22, 23
AKSE2B - RWYs 22, 23
AKSE2C - RWYs 34B
AKSE2H - RWYs 34B
AKSE2N - RWYs 22, 23
AKSELL - RWYs 16B
AKSELN - All RWYs
AKSELR - RWYs 16B
AKSELV - All RWYs
XAC1A - RWYs 34B
XAC1B - RWYs 22, 23
XAC1K - RWYs 34B
XAC1N - RWYs 22, 23
XAC2B - RWYs 22, 23
XAC2C - RWYs 34B
XAC2H - RWYs 34B
XAC2N - RWYs 22, 23
XACL - RWYs 16B
XACN - All RWYs
XACR - RWYs 16B
XACV - All RWYs

Terminal Information

Terminal 1


Terminal 1 and 2 at RJTT are nicknamed Big Bird because from a birds eye view, there in the shape of a bird. Terminal 1 opened in 1993 and is used for Japan Airlines domestic flights, along with Skymark Airlines, and SkyFlyer domestic flights. Terminal 1 also has a total of 24 gates assigned with jet bridges, and 66 remote gates

Terminal 2


Terminal 2 opened in 2004, and is used by All Nippon Airways for domestic flights, alongside it are Air Do, and Solaseed Air. Terminal 2 also has 24 gates assigned with jet bridges, but only has 13 remote gates.

Terminal 3 (International Terminal)


Terminal 3, also known as the International Terminal, opened in 2010, making it the newest terminal at RJTT, and serves all international flights out of RJTT. Terminal 3 also has multiple lounges, such as an ANA lounge, a JAL lounge, and Cathay Pacific lounge. Terminal 3 has 18 gates assigned with jet bridges, and 8 remote gates.

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NOTAMS:
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Operational Procedures at Tokyo Haneda Airport

Thank you so much for checking this out, I worked really hard on it, and I hope you enjoyed it, if you have any corrections, or suggestions, big or small, please let me know, as I would like to make this as accurate and informative as possible.

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Nice tutorial. A section on typical runway configurations would be great. I believe they typically only use approaches over the water at night. Something along those lines. Always helpful for controllers that don’t know the airport flow well, but want to try and use real life procedures.

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Really useful tutorial, thanks for creating this!

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I came across these runway usage charts for RJTT which will hopefully be useful for future reference.


As shown in the pictures, 04 and 05 are almost never used for landing.

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I just finished the North Wind operation and im in the process of the South Wind operation

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The two cardinal rules of RJTT if you want to be realistic:

  1. Never depart straight out to the north because it’s the middle of Tokyo, there are millions of people living right beneath you, and you will get noise complaints. You can approach straight in from the north in the afternoon hours only. If you depart from a 34 runway, you have to turn right immediately after takeoff and climb to altitude over the bay in order to avoid noise complaints.

I live right under the 16R approach path, and the only time I can ever hear airplanes is when someone flies a missed approach to the 34 runways. There was one occasion a couple months ago when a Turkish Airlines captain screwed up and took off to the north late at night, and the whole city was asking questions about what happened.

  1. No operations to the west because the airspace to the west is mostly controlled by the US military (Yokota AB and NAF Atsugi). The SIDs and STARs take you around the military airspace so I recommend using them whenever possible.

doesn’t Etihad operate to RJTT

No they don’t. Wikipedia is useful for checking current airlines and routes:

My bad they fly to Narita Airport not Haneda
makes sense since Narita offers more International flights
while Haneda is mostly Domestic flight

IRL, I just went from Haneda to Sydney yesterday on JAL. They’ve switched all these flights to Haneda it seems. It used to be always Narita; now it seems it’s always Haneda. I assume airlines like Jetstar(?) are still flying out of Narita, but I took the following from Booking.com:

And even that list is incomplete it seems. I took this fuzzy photo before departure, which I believe includes Finnair, Shanghai Air, Southern China (I think anyway):

I came across a slightly dated 3D picture of how the Haneda and Narita flight paths are usually arranged. It gives you a general idea of how traffic is supposed to flow around Tokyo.

image

This was drawn before they added international flights at Haneda and before they added the afternoon approaches from the north to 16L and 16R, but in general these patterns are still typically used.

Again the most important thing is to get to a high altitude before flying over the city or the Yokota airspace to the west (which is restricted to JSDF and US military operations).

I didn’t know there had been so much commentary on the noise and “steep approach” issues a few years ago for changes made to Haneda vicinity routes.

In the following from Japan Times: Flying low: The problems with new flight routes to Haneda Airport - YouTube
A pilot talks about concerns for the steepening of the approach angle increasing from 3 degrees to 3.45 degrees…and so I was thinking how steep is steep?: London City is 5.5 degrees apparently. But the difference is the type of aircraft used for each of these extremes of approach angle(?). London City is dominated by turboprop aircraft, with the only passenger jets used, are specially modified to contain airspeed on the steep approach (from what I understood anyway).

There were news reports of Tokyo residents protesting the increased noise apparently.

Two to three weeks ago, we definitely descended over the city, for a southerly approach after looping back from east of Tokyo Bay. I think maybe Shinagawa in particular was affected (looks like just north of the runways).

A video in Japanese showing what the 16R/16L approaches look like IRL:

This is what it looks like from ground level in Osaki, a major train station and high-rise district – planes fly over here at about 1,500 ft in the afternoon.

And here’s the 16L approach from the air, with another plane doing the parallel approach to 16R. (16L actually gets about twice as many landings as 16R because the last mile or two is over more industrial areas that don’t care as much about noise.)

RJTT in real life is currently a bit of an operational mess, with 16L/34R closed indefinitely following the collision earlier this week, and north wind operations in effect continuously since then. All departures have to use 05 and all arrivals have to use 34L, which means half as much runway capacity as usual. I saw about 20 aircraft in line for departure on FlightRadar24 this morning.

Thanks for gathering information. Great tutorial here, though it seems not many IFATC controller has gone through this. I know operation rules are bit complicated in RJTT, even making some people feel it strange having those rules that you’ll never imagine from the basics of selecting runway for example.

Hope those people especially ATC refer to the images you put so they’ll never force pilots to use runways that are never used in real life.

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