A guide to appealing ghosts

I think I should have been more clear.

I agree with you, the whole point of inquiring about your ghost is to learn. I do however believe that it is important to know what you were ghosted for, i.e. not following a sequence, landing on the wrong runway, etc. etc. A simple check in the logbook should accomplish this and is why I emphasized it so much in the original post.

As for the part under ‘If all else fails’ what would you say about wording it as

While all controllers are expected to explain their reasoning for ghosting, not all controllers may be willing to reverse the ghost.

1 Like

Couldnt have said it better!

The main purpose of this post is to in fact encourage pilots to appeal or at least inquire. I think that many of the people that are ghosted often are angry and confused and don’t inquire about their mistakes. This only leads to mistakes in the future and the process goes over and over again. All in all, by remaining civil, I assure you, something positive will come out of it, even if it’s not a reversal of the ghost.

1 Like

@n587kk,

I would 100% agree with you here. After being IFATC for a year and an IFATC officer for 6+ months, I have definitely made mistakes, learned along the way, and try to give the best support i can each and every time while learning and soaking it up from other controllers around me.

However, I think this thread goes along way to help someone figure out how to get help when it happens.

I try to give someone “check tutorials” and “please follow directions” as many times as i can before issuing a report (unless its just something bad). I wish there was a follow directions without “you will get ghosted” available as well as the one with ghosted, so that i dont have to sound as bad the first time…

But, it goes a VERY Long way when a person ghosted is nice and understand that they may have made a mistake, or… if they dont think they did, that they are STILL very nice and professional with talking with the controller. I know i speak for most ATC, that if someone is very understanding of the situation, we will reach out to have the report undone (if allowed based on prior history for the pilot).

4 Likes

I moved this back to #tutorials. This is a tutorial on how to go about appealing your ghost including procedures and tips.

Your first line of communication is a PM to the controller to discuss why. As stated above, if you have trouble locating a controller or need assistance with a ghost please contact a member of the moderating team.

7 Likes

I’ve made a few amendments to the original post.

First off, advanced ATC controllers are required to explain, in detail, why you were ghosted. Additionally, I’ve changed the wording in a couple of places to emphasize the importance of not reversing the ghost, but learning from the appeals process. Let me know if there’s anywhere else improvements can be made!

1 Like

Okay so I was reported by a controller at RKSI at roughly 0700zulu-0800zulu. I was in an f22. I was cleared for takeoff and taxi and was doing a short hop from RKSI to RKSS. I did read the ATIS a few times before contacting tower, but I forgot to extend my upwind after takeoff. After taking off about 500 ft from the runway, I started NAV and it unexpectedly banked right, which I thought was normal. The controller told me to extend upwind and I did. Without warning, I was reported by the controller and ghosted a few seconds afterwards. I did not complete my flight as I was too angry and upset about what had happened. If anyone knows who the controller is, please reply me via here. Much appreciated. I want to clear things up asap.

1 Like

Please contact the controller who ghosted you. This should be in your logbook.
If you dont know where that is, click infinite flight, and on the main menu there is settings, then logbook.

I really love this post. Very clear. Can anybody help me: where can I find the journal?

1 Like

I think you’re referring to the logbook:

Thanks, found it! I’ll dive into my history, see where I had violations and learn from it. Thanks a lot!

1 Like

Hi guys

I started using Infinite Flight a couple of days ago and managed to upgrade to grade 2. I am still learning to control some features of the atc and the planes, but I am following the instructions and I almost crashed because ATC didn’t continue my flight following. They sent me to the mountains. Yesterday I had to change airport mid flight. And wasn’t able to reduce speed. I got below 10000 feet at 265 speed. I got the first violation alert and did everything possible to reduce. It took me 2 minutes, but I got 5 violation warnings and got ghosted. My question is: did I commit 5 violations? Was my ghosting fair? How should I handle this? I felt a bit discouraged because I take the community seriously but I get the feeling sometimes we are left on our own by atc controlers when we are in the middle of a landing for example, and we are treated harshly when a situation of speeding comes and it is considered multi-violation.

What server were you on?

There are 20 seconds in between each Violation, plenty of time to throttle down and level out or throw out speed brakes. Your situation is similar to hundreds of others who’ve received the six violations, it would be out of the ordinary to make an exception.

That said, this thread is meant to be a guide on how to appeal, not meant to be used for individual appeals themselves.

Thanks for replying

I was on the training server. Swiss 1979.

I am not appealing. I am seeking guidance on how to appeal or if I should do it at all. I appreciate your honesty, though.

Did ATC instruct you to fly that speed?

There wasn’t atc only unicom, so I did everything on my own as a new learner. It took me a while to understand what to do. I used spoilers and increased vertical speed.

Ok, below 10,000ft you need to below 250knts IAS per IF and FAA regulations. Try to be at 260knts or close to that speed at 18,000ft AGL on descent so when you get closer to 10,000ft AGL the change in speed won’t be as drastic. Use the flight spoilers to slow down faster.

Thanks. Good tip.