777-300ER Cruise Problem

So in preperation for global, instead of being at my usual 18,000ft, I decided to climb to 37,000ft (777 ceiling is 43,500ft approved) and by the time I crossed 25,000 at V/S of 2,300ft with throttle at 99% N1 the aircraft is barely mainting M0.81 then by 30,000ft with 109% N1 throtte max M0.84 and V/S of 700ft barely climbing. IRL ive been on 777’s that go 1,500ft V/S at 30,000ft with N1 at 92% and go pretty loaded at that. Btw my load is 50% and flaps are closed with 0% trim. Is this a defect or am I doing something wrong.

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You need to reduce your vs. I propose stay below 2000 when over fl150

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Did you try step climbing once you went over 25,000?

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Step climbing is the key unless you reduce your VS.

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You should be reducing your VS

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I agree since it stands to reason that your vertical speed will drop because the airplanes engines are making less power due to the thinning air. Am I even close on this one?

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SAme problem here bus as others say step climb works well

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Take a look at a similar thread.

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I used to climb to 35,000 feet in the 777 all the time, I don’t think I had this problem.

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You’re climbing to fast. Try step climbing instead at a lower V/S. BTW should be in #support.

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Your climbing too fast step climbing works the best usually👍

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I brought up the same issue a while ago. I would climb effortlessly in the 300er. However, I was told that the max ceiling while at full capacity is FL280. From there as weight is reduced I could incrementally climb up to max FL350. The only 777 that still flies like that is the 777F in which you can climb straight to FL360 with a full load.

I was told that they reduced the lift on the 777-300er

No. It should NOT be in #support as there is nothing wrong with the app. Please read the guidelines for #support before posting something should be there again.

Same goes for you @Daniel14 :)

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A key factor is climb rate. I can climb up to FL380 with a full load. You have to step climb meaning leveling off at a certain altitude to burn some fuel or incrementally lower your VS. Very rarely do long haul aircraft go straight from take off to cruise altitude without step climbing.

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Yes, people say that you shoukd step climbing. It is not realistic, planes don’t step climb so it’s annot issue.
Yes, you can step climb to get there but you shouldn’t have to

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Think you find that most aircraft on long haul routes DO Step climb. If they take off at MTOW then they will need to burn off weight in order to reach max ceiling height. In theory they could do a slow steady climb up to max height as the fuel is burned off, however this would mess up with the ATC assigned heights therefore it is done in a series of steps.

Whilst I recommend you to do your own research, below article is very useful and will give you a working knowledge

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This could not be more incorrect.

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Recant your last statement. The evidence is mounting to prove otherwise.

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Can someone explain how does step climbing work and what should the V/S be after 25,000ft.

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There’s a article about it a few posts up…

1000-1500fpm should be good after 25.000ft depending on weight and accumulated speed at that flight level.

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